The benefits of becoming a registered childminder

If you’ve been mulling over the idea of starting a home childcare business, you may be torn between the options of launching a day nursery or registering as a childminder. While both are subject to regulation, those seeking part-time employment and greater flexibility often choose to register as a childminder instead. There are a number of benefits to providing this type of care, many of which are outlined below.

The Benefits of Becoming a Registered Childminder

1. Flexible hours

One of the primary benefits of becoming a childminder is the flexibility involved. Some choose to work for a few years before their own children are in school and they go back into the office, while others may watch children in the evenings and on weekends. You’re the boss, so you get to set your own hours. Many childminders choose to charge by the hour rather than by the term to help facilitate this flexibility.

2. Low start-up costs

Compared to other types of home businesses, becoming a childminder requires only a little bit of start-up cash. You’ll simply need to pay for training and registration fees, and potentially invest in new toys and learning materials for the children.

3. A way to gain childcare experience

Another benefit of childminding is that you get to interact with children other than your own, gaining insight and hands-on experience as you face new parenting challenges. This could help you with your own parenting skills, while also preparing you for a career down the road in education or childcare.

4. Transferable skills

Along these same lines, as you go through training to become a registered childminder you’ll gain transferable skills that could be used later in the workplace. As part of the training and registration process, you’ll need to take basic childcare courses. You can view a list of examples at to get an idea of what to expect. Ofsted also requires that childminders obtain a paediatric first aid certificate before registration. These types of qualifications give you skills that can be used in a number of situations.

5. Time to spend with your own children

The biggest benefit for mums is the ability to earn a side income while still spending time with your own children. If you’re not keen on going into the workplace all day while your children are cared for by someone else, this is a way around that dilemma. Childminding can be a good fit either as a temporary option or a full-time career.

Potential Downsides

Naturally, becoming a childminder isn’t for everyone. If you don’t have children of your own or don’t enjoy working with kids, it’s probably not the best career option. Think about how hard the day can be when your own children are teething, tired, or grumpy, and multiply this with each additional child you’re caring for! It also requires some degree of organization. Although becoming registered as a childminder requires less paperwork than opening a day nursery would, you can still expect to spend a bit of time going through the registration process. You’ll also need to keep assessment records for all children under five in your care, so implementing a filing system right from the start is a good idea.

Still, despite the high level of paperwork and hard work, many find that the numerous benefits of becoming a childminder outweigh these few drawbacks!


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