Why Home Livability Goes Beyond Aesthetics

If there’s one thing many people fail to mention about moving to a new house, buying a new house, or even renting a new place by yourself, it’s that the livability of a place goes far beyond the immediate aesthetic value of the place. Sure, you might find a house that looks great from the outset, but when you’re actually living in the place, there will be things that annoy you about it.

Figuring out how to recognise those things before you move in is the key to always living in places that are great to be in. We thought that the issue of recognising livability was crucial, especially in today’s housing market, so we decided to put together a list of things to check for when inspecting your potential future home.

Location

The location of your home might seem like a pretty obvious thing to take into account when choosing a home, but knowing what to look for as far as proximity to things goes can be a bit trickier. A home that is equal distance from two train stations and near to a high school might sound great for a family with kids about to enter into secondary education, for instance. However,  if both train stations are a 20 min walk away and the high school is going to be audible from inside your home at all hours of the day, these will turn from good points into bad ones. Pick your location carefully, and think about what will be most common as far as irritants go.

Structure Quality

The quality of the structure of your potential home is also of great importance, as a poorly or cheaply constructed framework can be vulnerable to termites and other pests. Termite treatment is always an option for a home you’ve bought, but knowing what signs to look out for in places you’re going to rent will save you a lot of hassle and back and forth communication with the real estate agents and landlords.

Piping

The quality of the plumbing is very important when it comes to your livability factors. Even if the place is aesthetically perfect, a damaged plumbing line can cause thousands of dollars of water damage throughout your home at the first sign of rain. Check the age of the pipes and the age of the installation, ask the agent about the construction of the house to ascertain how old it is and find out what kind of pipes they are. You can save yourself money in the future by getting some of the more damaged pipes replaced before they need replacing, but knowing what you’re getting yourself into before you move in is a good idea.

Wiring

The electronic work that was done on your house in the construction phase can heavily impact how your home functions, and how livable it is as well. Think of how many times in the past you have been frustrated that you didn’t have enough power points in a given room. How many times you have had to run extension cables across doorways, and how many times you’ve needed to buy a lamp to offset the lack of a light there. Examine your potential home with this in mind, as it can drive a person crazy over time, and through the examination, you can also assess if there are any potential wiring issues.

With these points in mind, you are more prepared to make an informed decision about the way your new home will function, and what does and doesn’t need work straight away. Remember to always hire professionals to do the work, even if you own the place, as the peace of mind is well worth the cost.

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Photo Credit: Brian Babb Patrick Perkins Breno Assis

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