What To Do When Your Child Sustains An Injury

It’s every parent’s worst nightmare, so when your child sustains an injury, it’s certainly hard not to panic. In most cases, the injury is either minor or easily healed over time. In worst cases, though, a child may be hurt in a way that causes long-term damage, which requires acute medical attention, perhaps even prolonged treatment. Should this be the case, medical professionals will advise you on the best course of action, and you should trust their recommended course.

However, if your child is currently experiencing a minor or healable injury, here’s what you can do to help…

When it happens, try not to panic

Your first reaction will likely be of fear and alarm: how could you not feel anxious about your child’s injury? However, as your child will look to you for reassurance and comfort, if you can approach the situation as calmly as possible, you’ll have a positive impact on the child who is hurt too.

If you are able to keep a steady head, you’ll be able to see the right course of action more clearly. Does your child need urgent medical attention, or is it something you can deal with within the family?  

Seek help as soon as possible

If your child does need medical attention, you should seek this as soon as reasonably possible. It might mean a trip to Accident and Emergency at your local hospital, or perhaps just a visit to the GP. If you’re unsure of the best next step, try calling the NHS Emergency phone line on 111, which is dedicated to urgent but not life-threatening situations.

Further down the line, you may wish to speak to a professional about how the accident or injury occurred in the first place; you may be liable for some compensation. Even if your child has been injured as part of a medical procedure, there are people who can help you better understand the situation and protest against the wrongdoings which caused the illness. Visit the-medical-negligence-experts.co.uk to find out more.

Give them the attention they need…

Healing takes time, but your child may not want to lie still and stay in the home — they’ll want to be outside, playing and being a normal kid! Encourage them to take it slow; treat them to little treats and spend more time with them during their recovery process.

Try to make their time at home as fun as possible, by playing games or set up a home cinema experience for them. Whatever you can do to make the recovery time pass swiftly.

… but try not to mollycoddle them

However, there’s a fine line to walk. You don’t want to overindulge or pamper them too much, showing too much concern. Remember, kids, bounce back mentally a lot faster than adults do. If you show too much concern and worry, you may subconsciously slow down their healing process by transferring your fears onto them. You want your child to be able to fully recover and not live their life in fear of sustaining another injury of some sort.

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Photo Credit: Alexander Dummer Jordan Whitt

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